Elephant saves crying baby trapped under debris!
Despite growing human-elephant tensions in the region, a rampaging elephant, upon hearing a child cry, turned back to the home he’d just torn apart and “carefully removed every last bit of stone, brick, and mortar from the infant’s body before heading back into the forest.”
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Elephant saves crying baby trapped under debris!

Despite growing human-elephant tensions in the region, a rampaging elephant, upon hearing a child cry, turned back to the home he’d just torn apart and “carefully removed every last bit of stone, brick, and mortar from the infant’s body before heading back into the forest.”

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Mother Goats Don’t Forget The Sound Of Their Kids’ Voices!
Not only are mother goats able to pick out the sound of their own kid’s call from other kids as soon as they’re five days old, a study has shown that they still recognize their calls after having been separated for a year! We’re pretty sure they remember those calls forever, but the study didn’t go that long.
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Mother Goats Don’t Forget The Sound Of Their Kids’ Voices!

Not only are mother goats able to pick out the sound of their own kid’s call from other kids as soon as they’re five days old, a study has shown that they still recognize their calls after having been separated for a year! We’re pretty sure they remember those calls forever, but the study didn’t go that long.

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Cows have best friends!
Cows are very sociable, and develop close relationships with members of their herd - they even have best friends that they prefer to spend their time with. This also means that they become stressed when isolated. “When heifers had their preferred partner with them, their stress levels were reduced compared with if they were with a random individual” says Krista McLennan. Hanging out with their BFFs has such a positive impact on them that it could even “improve their milk yield” and “reduce their stress, which is very important for their welfare.”
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Cows have best friends!

Cows are very sociable, and develop close relationships with members of their herd - they even have best friends that they prefer to spend their time with. This also means that they become stressed when isolated. “When heifers had their preferred partner with them, their stress levels were reduced compared with if they were with a random individual” says Krista McLennan. Hanging out with their BFFs has such a positive impact on them that it could even “improve their milk yield” and “reduce their stress, which is very important for their welfare.”

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Butterfly Mothers Choose Plants for Medicinal Qualities!
When monarch butterfly mothers are infected with a parasite that is deadly to their offspring, they choose to lay their eggs on a medicinal species of plant known as tropical milkweed. However, they only choose this particular variety of milkweed when they are infected - there are other varieties that they prefer if they aren’t infected. Though tropical milkweed isn’t that helpful to the adult butterflies, when their young feed on it, it helps to decrease the devastating symptoms of the disease. "So somehow they know that they’re infected and they know what to do about it."

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Butterfly Mothers Choose Plants for Medicinal Qualities!

When monarch butterfly mothers are infected with a parasite that is deadly to their offspring, they choose to lay their eggs on a medicinal species of plant known as tropical milkweed. However, they only choose this particular variety of milkweed when they are infected - there are other varieties that they prefer if they aren’t infected. Though tropical milkweed isn’t that helpful to the adult butterflies, when their young feed on it, it helps to decrease the devastating symptoms of the disease. "So somehow they know that they’re infected and they know what to do about it."

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Snails are romantic!
When preparing to mate, snails often engage in mating rituals that can last for a number of hours. This can involve circling around each other, touching with their tentacles, and biting lips and the genital area. In other words, lovemaking!
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Snails are romantic!

When preparing to mate, snails often engage in mating rituals that can last for a number of hours. This can involve circling around each other, touching with their tentacles, and biting lips and the genital area. In other words, lovemaking!

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Wild elephants can tell human languages apart!
In Amboseli National Park in Kenya, humans and elephants sometimes come into conflict over resources. While Maasai men will sometimes kill elephants in confrontations over grazing for cattle, Kamba men are less of a threat. When scientists played voice recordings of men from the different tribes, elephants reacted more defensively to the Maasai language because they recognized them as the more threatening tribe.
Since women almost never spear the elephants, the elephants reacted less to recordings of women’s voices. Same thing with young boys’ voices. 
Even when the female and male voices were altered to sound like the other gender (females lowered and males raised) the elephants still moved away from the altered male voices but not the altered female voices!

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Wild elephants can tell human languages apart!

In Amboseli National Park in Kenya, humans and elephants sometimes come into conflict over resources. While Maasai men will sometimes kill elephants in confrontations over grazing for cattle, Kamba men are less of a threat. When scientists played voice recordings of men from the different tribes, elephants reacted more defensively to the Maasai language because they recognized them as the more threatening tribe.

Since women almost never spear the elephants, the elephants reacted less to recordings of women’s voices. Same thing with young boys’ voices. 

Even when the female and male voices were altered to sound like the other gender (females lowered and males raised) the elephants still moved away from the altered male voices but not the altered female voices!

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Animal Legal Defense Fund: No Zoo Animal is “Surplus”
"By slaughtering Marius, the Copenhagen Zoo demonstrated apathy for Marius’ life and his individuality. It illustrates the common viewpoint of zoos (and most wildlife “management” agencies) that individual wild animals, whether captive or free-roaming, are not deserving of consideration as individuals—only “populations” matter. And it highlights how this view translates into a lack of concern for the well-being of animals in zoos or other captive environments." ~Stephen Wells, aldf.org

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Animal Legal Defense Fund: No Zoo Animal is “Surplus”

"By slaughtering Marius, the Copenhagen Zoo demonstrated apathy for Marius’ life and his individuality. It illustrates the common viewpoint of zoos (and most wildlife “management” agencies) that individual wild animals, whether captive or free-roaming, are not deserving of consideration as individuals—only “populations” matter. And it highlights how this view translates into a lack of concern for the well-being of animals in zoos or other captive environments."
~Stephen Wells, aldf.org

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Horses Do Not Graze Near Their Own Dung!
Because it’s gross, obviously, and horses realize that, since they are living beings that think, just like we are. This “Zone Of Repugnance” is avoided by horses and herbivores in general. Pretty smart!
Happy Year of the Wood Horse!

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Horses Do Not Graze Near Their Own Dung!

Because it’s gross, obviously, and horses realize that, since they are living beings that think, just like we are. This “Zone Of Repugnance” is avoided by horses and herbivores in general. Pretty smart!

Happy Year of the Wood Horse!

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Click to watch this dog, sledding!

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Crickets Sing Like A Choir Of Angels!

This is the sound of two recordings of crickets played together. The only thing that has been manipulated is that one of the tracks was slowed way down. Trust us, it’s worth your time.

"It sounds like a choir, it sounds like angel music. Something sparkling, celestial with full harmony and bass parts - you wouldn’t believe it. ~Tom Waits on Jim Wilson’s ‘God’s Chorus of Crickets’.


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Crickets Sing Like A Choir Of Angels!

This is the sound of two recordings of crickets played together. The only thing that has been manipulated is that one of the tracks was slowed way down. Trust us, it’s worth your time.

"It sounds like a choir, it sounds like angel music. Something sparkling, celestial with full harmony and bass parts - you wouldn’t believe it.
~Tom Waits on Jim Wilson’s ‘God’s Chorus of Crickets’.

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Elephants instinctively ‘get’ human pointing! 
Elephants do not require any training to understand human pointing - they just naturally understand that we’re trying to draw their attention when we point at something! What’s interesting about this is that many great apes fail to understand this particular type of communication - even though we’re more closely related to them than we are to elephants.
PS: Congratulations Iringa, Toka and Thika!!!
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Elephants instinctively ‘get’ human pointing!

Elephants do not require any training to understand human pointing - they just naturally understand that we’re trying to draw their attention when we point at something! What’s interesting about this is that many great apes fail to understand this particular type of communication - even though we’re more closely related to them than we are to elephants.

PS: Congratulations Iringa, Toka and Thika!!!

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Cats Really Do Love Boxes!www.anthropomorphia.comLike us on Facebook!

Cats Really Do Love Boxes!

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Trampoline Time!
So if you can enjoy jumping on a trampoline, then why can’t dogs and cats (maybe) and pigs and goats and foxes and a buffalo like it too? (click photo to watch the video - you’ll have a great time!)
(thanks Emily!)
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Trampoline Time!

So if you can enjoy jumping on a trampoline, then why can’t dogs and cats (maybe) and pigs and goats and foxes and a buffalo like it too?

(click photo to watch the video - you’ll have a great time!)

(thanks Emily!)

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